Sunday Loot

Sunday Loot: #GameDev Opportunities & Brand New #GameJobs

Image courtesy of VICE
Image courtesy of VICE

Happy Sunday, friends! And a very happy Mother’s Day to those of you who celebrate. ❤ We’re very excited to have the chance to share more opportunities in the gaming industry yet again this week! It’s with your help that we’re able to bring so many awesome gigs to the table, and we sincerely appreciate that continued enthusiasm. Thanks for being you!

Expect to see a brand new scholarship program, speaking opportunities, as well as the latest job positions. It’s never been a more exciting time to break into this industry, and we’re here to help you along the way! Never forget that your work is really rad and necessary, because we certainly won’t. Let’s get started then, shall we?

As always, if you know of an inclusive gaming space or games project you’d love to see promoted on our Sunday Loot series, drop us a comment below or check out our contact list! We’d love to hear from you, especially about new and exciting spaces where all gamers can hang out. ✌

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Sunday Loot

Sunday Loot: #GameDev Events, Jobs, & Resources

Invisible Wall
Art by Emilie Majarian

Happy Sunday, friends! (And Happy Easter to those of you who celebrate.) We’re back with quite a few incredible resources for all your game dev needs, so settle in with that cup of coffee and break out the fancy highlighters! You’ll really want to take note of all the opportunities listed here.

In our continued effort to encourage a more diverse, inclusive gaming industry, and with the help of many of @bendingb’s suggestions, we’ve gathered together two pioneering spaces, an inspirational event, a new job opening, and countless other ways to hone your craft. It may be difficult to break into game development, but we’re here to help! It is possible, and you can do it. We believe in you!

As always, if you know of an inclusive gaming space or games project you’d love to see promoted on our Sunday Loot series, drop us a comment below or check out our contact list! We’d love to hear from you, especially about new and exciting spaces where all gamers can hang out. ✌

Continue reading “Sunday Loot: #GameDev Events, Jobs, & Resources”

Development, Interviews, LGBTQA

Blanket Fort Chats: Game Making With Paige Ashlynn

Image courtesy of Paige Ashlynn
Image courtesy of Paige Ashlynn & MidBoss

Blanket Fort Chats” is a weekly column featuring women and nonbinary game makers talking about the craft of making games. In this week’s post, we feature Paige Ashlynn, a trans femme nonbinary game developer and former indie studio owner now working a​t MidBoss on Read Only Memories.

Miss N: Can you tell us a bit about your background and how you got into making games?

PaigeSure thing! I’ve been programming since I was a tween, but I never expected—or really even wanted—to do games for a living. During college, I worked a series of internships trying out every type of professional programming that interested me and being disappointed with each in turn. Friends had been telling me to give games a shot for years, so I grudgingly took some classes. To my surprise, I found I loved the process. In particular, the collaborative, multidisciplinary nature of game development is super energizing.

In 2012, I co-founded a game development studio with a team of fellow students. I attended my first GDC shortly thereafter, played dys4ia in the IGF pavilion, met amazing trans developers, and decided that this was the career for me! My team ran a successful Kickstarter and spent the next two years creating Magnetic By Nature, a puzzle platformer with cool graphics and a fun mechanic.

Since then, I’ve done a lot of traveling to game events, some volunteering, made some small games, and met a lot of wonderful people. I’ve completely fallen in love with the indie gamedev community!

Continue reading “Blanket Fort Chats: Game Making With Paige Ashlynn”

Development, Feminism, Interviews

Blanket Fort Chats: Game Making With Diane Mueller

Image courtesy of Diane Mueller
Image courtesy of Diane Mueller

Blanket Fort Chats” is a weekly column featuring women and nonbinary game makers talking about the craft of making games. In this week’s post, we feature Diane “MadameBerry” Mueller, an independent game developer creating weird tiny games.

Miss N: Can you tell us a little bit about your background and how you got into making games?

Diane: While taking part in a beta test for a small MMO in high school, I discovered I loved seeing the game evolve. After that, I pursued a degree in game development from Savannah College of Art and Design. I originally went for 3D modeling, but found I had a much better appreciation for design. While the degree had a great focus on preparing students for AAA development, I was able to develop my own design style and teach myself pixel art.

Anyway, I create small games with narrow focuses, as well as Patreon-funded experiments and prototypes.

Miss N: What’s your earliest memory of playing games?

Diane: My dad had an old NES he’d let my brother and I use occasionally. He didn’t like us playing games much, and eventually sold the NES (which he regrets doing) under the rule that if we got a new console, we would have to sell the old one first. I remember playing Duck Hunt, Top Gun, Super Mario Bros, and Legend of Zelda, though we never got very far in any of them.

Continue reading “Blanket Fort Chats: Game Making With Diane Mueller”

Development, Feminism, Interviews

Blanket Fort Chats: Game Making With Vaida Plankyte

Image courtesy of Vaida Plankyte
Image courtesy of Vaida Plankyte

Blanket Fort Chats” is a weekly column featuring women and nonbinary game makers talking about the craft of making games. In this week’s post, we feature Vaida Plankyte, a Scotland-based game designer who enjoys making small personal games, experimenting with narration, and live-tweeting movies, apparently.

Miss N: Can you tell us a little bit about your background and how you got into making games?

Vaida: I am currently studying Computer Science with Management in Edinburgh. I had tried making games on several occasions growing up, but coding seemed like such a difficult hurdle to overcome. I would abandon projects as soon as I hit a roadblock.

In 2014, I decided to use Twitter more so I could follow game developers, and around that time, the FlappyJam was announced. Its host encouraged me to make a small something, reminding me that Construct 2 was very easy to use and didn’t require any programming. I enjoyed the experience so much that the month after, I started One Game A Month.

Miss N: What’s your earliest memory of playing games?

Vaida: The very first game I played was a Lithuanian educational game with my mom on our home computer. I didn’t own a console then, so I would play anything I could find online. I recall playing a lot of Cartoon Network games when I was little — it’s partly how I learned English, trying to figure out what a quest meant by trial and error. When I moved to France, I remember spending a lot of time on Newgrounds; I found their Art Games collection particularly interesting.

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Development, Feminism, Health

Blanket Fort Chats: Game Making With Phoenix Perry

[Courtesy of Phoenix Perry.]
[Courtesy of Phoenix Perry.]
Blanket Fort Chats” is a weekly column featuring women and nonbinary game makers talking about the craft of making games. In this week’s post, we feature Phoenix Perry, an experienced developer, accidental public figure, and general rabble-rouser. She’s currently a lecturer at Goldsmiths, University of London where she teaches physical computing and games.

Miss N: Can you tell us a little bit about your background and how you got into making games?

Phoenix: I got into games from making experimental movies. From there, I had a huge desire to work on projects that created empathy and emotion in a very physical way. My first project was an emergent system/interactive story that focused on bee colonies and collective ecologies. The underpinning idea behind it could be best summed up by Spock in The Wrath of Khan: “Logic clearly dictates that the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few.”

Players worked in teams to achieve their team’s goal in a system where every choice impacted the entire game ecology. Your choice to take more or less of a resource impacted all other players who could, in turn, impact you. This game was called Honey and I made it back in 2006. It also yielded a pervasive version called Picky Sticky Pollen that I showed at Come Out and Play in 2008.

Honey by Phoenix Perry
Honey by Phoenix Perry

Miss N: What’s your earliest memory of playing games? 

Phoenix: That’s definitely Pac-Man. It was the ’80s and I was wearing a rainbow swimsuit. I remember laying on brown carpet with my joystick for hours after that. It was awesome. My other favorite games were ET and Missile Command. Beyond that, there was a game about coming to NYC as an Italian immigrant on the Apple II—I was really fond of being Italian. I wish I knew the name of it. It was a choose your own adventure-style game. I would imagine being my grandmother.

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