Stay Tuned for Danger(ous Adaptations): ‘Nancy Drew’ From Page to Screen

[Editor’s Note: All screencaps are courtesy of littlenancydrewthings.]

When Her Interactive (HI) was still a division of American Laser Games in 1995, there were at least 128 titles in the main Nancy Drew book series and a handful of spin-offs, including the darker and more intense Nancy Drew Files. I can only imagine it was not an easy task for developers to choose a precise starting point and tone when adapting a single game or even a series from these books.

A lot can be said about the books and games individually, but I haven’t come across anything — apart from the occasional HI board topic or Arglefumph book review — that directly compares the books to the games upon which they are based. On the one hand, they shouldn’t have to. The Nancy Drew games must be able to stand on their own, and they definitely do. You don’t need to read the source material to understand the stories or characters because you can appreciate them as they are.

But are there instances where the game missed opportunities that the book provided? Or even moments when the game actually managed to surpass the book? It’s more complicated than an absolute yes or no, as the games are only loosely based upon the books. Generally, they are used as a blueprint in order to set up the mystery and suspects rather than as an absolute rigid guideline.

Therefore, I’m not going to cover every single book that was adapted or write an in-depth ‘book versus game’ analysis for the entire series (or, at least, not in one article). Instead, I’ve chosen select titles among the ones I’ve read that were adapted into games. Namely, the books that two of my absolute favorite games in the entire series were based: Stay Tuned for Danger (STFD) and Secret of the Scarlet Hand (SSH). [Warning: Major spoilers ahead!]

Continue reading “Stay Tuned for Danger(ous Adaptations): ‘Nancy Drew’ From Page to Screen”

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Why Ganondorf Was Wrong in ‘The Wind Waker’

The Wind Waker

Perhaps the most interesting thing about The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker is that, as the player, it’s not your job to prevent the end the world. Rather, your goal is to ensure an apocalypse that has already occurred is not reversed. In an ironic role-reversal, it’s the villain of the game, Ganondorf, who wants to save the world by correcting a cataclysmic ecological disaster. He is not wrong to do so. Why, then, is he the villain?

The Wind Waker encourages the player to understand that the natural world must be allowed to transform itself at its own pace without drastic human intervention. Ganondorf is not wrong for wanting to save the world, but the deeper message of The Wind Waker is that the world does not, in fact, need to be saved.

The Wind Waker has a backstory that is surprisingly dark and complicated for a game with such cute graphics. It’s difficult to explain how the apocalypse that proceeds the game happened, but suffice it to say that, because of an environmental apocalypse, the once-flourishing land of Hyrule lies beneath a seemingly endless body of water referred to only as “the Great Sea.” No one remembers the ancient kingdom, and people live on small islands rising from the waves.

Link’s journey begins on one such island, appropriately named Outset Island. A giant bird suddenly appears and kidnaps his sister Aryll, so he hitches a ride with a passing gang of pirates who deliver him to another island called “the Forsaken Fortress,” which is rumored to serve as the base of operations of someone searching for girls with pointed ears — a marker of the ethnic heritage of the royal Hylian race.

The master of the Forsaken Fortress is Ganondorf, and he is in fact searching for the descendent of Princess Zelda. Before Hyrule was flooded, the Hylian kings and queens guarded a magical artifact called the Triforce, which was said to have the power to grant the wishes of anyone who touched it. Knowing that Zelda’s descendent will be able to lead him to the Triforce, Ganondorf scours the Great Sea for her, hoping to use the Triforce to make the waters of the Great Sea vanish. Link’s sister turns out to not be Zelda’s descendent, but this has nothing to do with the boy’s desire to rescue her, and so his quest begins.

Continue reading “Why Ganondorf Was Wrong in ‘The Wind Waker’”

The Search for Positive Portrayals of Fatness in Games

atelier

From childhood bullying to fake concern from friends and family to society physically and emotionally rejecting your body, being fat has always been hard. Where can a fat person turn to for an ounce of respite? Video games might be a viable option, but alas, they are sprinkled with all the fat-shaming a person finds in the real world. I decided to dig deeper into how fatness is portrayed within video games and I found the impossible: a positive portrayal of fatness. However, before I can showcase that example, I need to explain a bad one, which will be easy due to the abundance of negative portrayals.

I decided to pick a character from the games series that I am currently playing. It is called Atelier, a typically super cute series that features adorable girls. These games revolve around a central protagonist (sometimes two) who is an alchemist. They must either solve some kind of overarching problem with their alchemy or simply train to become a better alchemist.

In Atelier Sophie: The Alchemist of the Mysterious Book, Sophie is our main protagonist. She desires to improve her alchemy skills, and one day, she finds a book from her late grandmother … that can talk. This book ultimately guides her through becoming an alchemy master, however, the book has lost all its old memories. While Sophie continues to build upon her skills, she looks for a way to recover what was lost. Sounds cool, right? I mean, I like them. They can be a bit corny (okay, a lot corny), but sometimes a girl wants corny games.

The character from Atelier Sophie who is shown as fat is named Oskar Behlmer. Although he actually looks realistically fat and not like a balloon, the game still ends up making his weight a crucial part of his personality. He is described as extremely lazy and irresponsible, and throughout the game, Oskar leaves his mother to maintain their shop alone while he lays around in nature. Except his special ability is talking to plants. Who wouldn’t want to be around nature if they could talk to plants?

Sadly, Atelier Sophie portrays Oskar’s love of plants as shirking his duties. Even on the Wikipedia page for his character, Oskar is described as “lazy and unfit.” He also constantly gets fake concern from literally every single character in the game; from comments like “Wouldn’t you feel better if you lost weight?” to the grossly inappropriate “You would be so handsome if you lost weight!”

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That’s Me: ‘Nancy Drew’ Reveals First Canon Queer Character

Nancy Drew, Sea of Darkness

[Editor’s Note: All screencaps courtesy of littlenancydrewthings.]

The Nancy Drew games have been revolutionary in many ways, but regressive in others. While the developers have tried to evenly round out racial representation (overall — not counting individual games), feature a 50:50 ratio of men to women in the entire series, and include suspects who struggle with depression and/or anxiety, there is one particular aspect of diversity that these games have been sorely lacking in: queer diversity.

Her Interactive (HI) — the company behind the Nancy Drew games — has made a point of making their titles “family-friendly,” and extended this policy to their official message boards. The Golden Rule was to keep it G-rated. While the idea behind this approach is understandable because of the series’ original target demographic (pre-teen girls) and the personal responsibility HI felt to keep their official boards safe for minors, the execution fell short. This isn’t to say that the boards weren’t safe for minors, which they were by standard internet safety precautions, but the manner in which they were meant to be safe was built around heteronormative constructs of what constitutes as “family-friendly.”

To comply with the series’ consistent E rating, any romance or relationships in the games — implied or explicitly shown — had to be pair-ups between (presumably) heterosexual men and (presumably) heterosexual women. Because of an underlying assumption in the ESRB ratings that to be queer was to be hypersexual, abiding by the ESRB standards meant absolutely no explicit references to characters being even remotely queer at all (in the games or on the HI boards). As a result, queer fans of Nancy Drew were told to be silent and weren’t allowed to even speculate that a character was gay on the forums without risking a ban (a rule that was recently lifted a few years ago).

For a while, it seemed as if the Nancy Drew series would never be anything other than heteronormative in their relationships and characters; or that any characters who might be queer could only ever be expressed as such through queer-coding, and would never rise above anything other than subtext. And then one day, along came the latest (as of this typing) game in the series that bucked the trend entirely: Sea of Darkness[Minor spoilers for SEA ahead.]

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Conversations From the ‘Final Fantasy XV’ Locker Room

Final Fantasy XV

Several months before Final Fantasy XV was released, I saw the arguments beginning: how could a video game franchise with such a long history of including women as playable characters release a game with a main cast of four men? I empathized with the outrage: women who grew up with the Final Fantasy franchise felt like it had been their safe haven for representation, and the reveal that this title would be all about Noctis, Ignis, Prompto, and Gladiolus felt like a betrayal.

Still, I (perhaps foolishly) entered into debates where fans demanded we boycott the game, gently suggesting that we have a little faith in the Final Fantasy franchise. Although no one ‘earns the right’ to stop representing women in their games, I felt as though Final Fantasy’s history of featuring dynamic ladies (including Lightning as the protagonist of Final Fantasy XIII) meant that I should give them the benefit of the doubt. This is a video game franchise that — at least to some extent — understands the importance of gender representation. Maybe their story about a journey shared by four men was a narrative worth telling.

Although I wasn’t alone in this speculation, I felt like I was in the minority. However, when Final Fantasy XV was released, I was not disappointed.

Bear with me for a moment while I make a brief aside: it was only two months ago that we heard Donald Trump justify bragging about sexual assault by referring to it as “locker room talk.” The implication that men are permitted or expected to speak crudely about women when we are not around in order to impress their mates was a sentiment that outraged a lot of people — including athletes who are very familiar with actual locker rooms. But it’s a common narrative: in order to impress one another and be accepted, men are expected to objectify and insult women.

While some men behave in this way because it adheres to their genuine view of women, there are also followers and bystanders who engage in this narrative because it’s what they believe they must do after seeing it in every movie, on every television show, and — with people like Trump justifying it in the public political sphere — on every news program. This can lead to all sorts of strange situations, including groups of men who don’t really believe anything they’re saying, yet still make crude comments or ‘rate’ women in terms of appearance because they think that other men expect it.

It’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. It’s rape culture. So how do we dismantle the idea of what occurs in a boys’ locker room without first creating one?

Continue reading “Conversations From the ‘Final Fantasy XV’ Locker Room”

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