That’s Me: ‘Nancy Drew’ Reveals First Canon Queer Character

Nancy Drew, Sea of Darkness

[Editor’s Note: All screencaps courtesy of littlenancydrewthings.]

The Nancy Drew games have been revolutionary in many ways, but regressive in others. While the developers have tried to evenly round out racial representation (overall — not counting individual games), feature a 50:50 ratio of men to women in the entire series, and include suspects who struggle with depression and/or anxiety, there is one particular aspect of diversity that these games have been sorely lacking in: queer diversity.

Her Interactive (HI) — the company behind the Nancy Drew games — has made a point of making their titles “family-friendly,” and extended this policy to their official message boards. The Golden Rule was to keep it G-rated. While the idea behind this approach is understandable because of the series’ original target demographic (pre-teen girls) and the personal responsibility HI felt to keep their official boards safe for minors, the execution fell short. This isn’t to say that the boards weren’t safe for minors, which they were by standard internet safety precautions, but the manner in which they were meant to be safe was built around heteronormative constructs of what constitutes as “family-friendly.”

To comply with the series’ consistent E rating, any romance or relationships in the games — implied or explicitly shown — had to be pair-ups between (presumably) heterosexual men and (presumably) heterosexual women. Because of an underlying assumption in the ESRB ratings that to be queer was to be hypersexual, abiding by the ESRB standards meant absolutely no explicit references to characters being even remotely queer at all (in the games or on the HI boards). As a result, queer fans of Nancy Drew were told to be silent and weren’t allowed to even speculate that a character was gay on the forums without risking a ban (a rule that was recently lifted a few years ago).

For a while, it seemed as if the Nancy Drew series would never be anything other than heteronormative in their relationships and characters; or that any characters who might be queer could only ever be expressed as such through queer-coding, and would never rise above anything other than subtext. And then one day, along came the latest (as of this typing) game in the series that bucked the trend entirely: Sea of Darkness[Minor spoilers for SEA ahead.]

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An Interview With Rooster Teeth Rigging Artist Gio Coutinho

Gio Coutinho

Gio Coutinho is a rigging artist at Rooster Teeth. She’s been involved in projects such as RWBY, RWBY Chibi, and Red vs. Blue, and somehow finds time to record Autodesk tutorials about the techniques she uses for people wanting to follow in her footsteps. I recently had the chance to talk to Gio about her work, and how she came to be one of the most prominent professionals in her field.

Alayna: Hi, Gio! It’s awesome to have a chance to chat with you. Tell us: what does a rigging artist do?

Gio: Hi, Alayna! It’s great to chat with you, too.

I like to think of a rig as a marionette. Imagine a stiff, motionless doll with no articulations — that is a 3D model. It’s a completely static figure that is made from a 2D concept. As a rigging artist, I take that doll or 3D model and give it strings, which allow it to move and articulate however it needs to, so I work closely with animators to ensure all their requirements are met.

That being said, not only do characters need rigging — anything that moves, including props, sets, and vehicles often need rigs in order to come to life. A good rig is easy and intuitive to use, taking work away from animators since they are the ones responsible for making them perform according to a script and/or storyboard. A bad rig, however, imposes limits on animators, which in turn decreases the overall aesthetic potential of whatever they try to produce.

In more technical terms, a rig is often composed of a skeleton, controls, constraints, and a number of other features that help something move the way it needs to. There is a lot of problem solving involved in order to find the optimum way for something to move, and you must have a very keen artistic and technical eye to reach creative solutions to specific problems and challenges.

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Autism & Empowerment: What Gaming Means to Me

pokemon

The word “empowerment” is thrown around quite frequently in discussions surrounding identity and representation in media. Seeing or reading a positive and respectful depiction of one’s identity can have a tremendously beneficial impact on an individual, especially if said individual is from a marginalized community.

That being said, what defines empowerment can mean different things to different people — especially within the medium of video games. This can include the ability to choose or, ideally, to customize the pronouns one is able to use when playing a game; the chance to accurately represent your skin tone and natural hair in a game’s character customization; or the option to romance characters who are the same gender as the player. All of these features can be deemed empowering, which results in an extremely satisfying gaming experience.

With this in mind, I cannot help but wonder, as an autistic woman, what images of empowerment come to mind when autistic people reflect on their favorite video games. For those of us on the autism spectrum, video games can be a tool to relax and break away from the stresses and anxieties that everyday life presents — be it sensory overload or the exhaustion associated with social interactions. I, myself, recognize the importance that video games have had in helping me cope during trying times, alongside enjoying them for their distinctive methods of storytelling and engrossing gameplay.  

Despite this reality, allistic (non-autistic) writers and developers fail to recognize that their works can be perceived as empowering to an autistic audience. While I cannot state exactly why this is, I believe a combination of ignorance and misinformation is why allistic writers are still far behind in providing positive experiences for their autistic fans. They showcase ignorance through their failure to realize that autistic audiences exist, and probably already enjoy their work, and they are misinformed by only being able to comprehend autistic identities from a stereotypical or ableist point of view.

I have decided to relate on what aspects of video games have been empowering to me as an autistic woman gamer.  I cannot guarantee that my experiences of empowerment will be exactly the same as all autistic gamers — especially since both the autistic spectrum and the category of “gamer” are extremely diverse even without the overlap between the two — but I can say that these experiences are important to me because I am autistic.

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Conversations From the ‘Final Fantasy XV’ Locker Room

Final Fantasy XV

Several months before Final Fantasy XV was released, I saw the arguments beginning: how could a video game franchise with such a long history of including women as playable characters release a game with a main cast of four men? I empathized with the outrage: women who grew up with the Final Fantasy franchise felt like it had been their safe haven for representation, and the reveal that this title would be all about Noctis, Ignis, Prompto, and Gladiolus felt like a betrayal.

Still, I (perhaps foolishly) entered into debates where fans demanded we boycott the game, gently suggesting that we have a little faith in the Final Fantasy franchise. Although no one ‘earns the right’ to stop representing women in their games, I felt as though Final Fantasy’s history of featuring dynamic ladies (including Lightning as the protagonist of Final Fantasy XIII) meant that I should give them the benefit of the doubt. This is a video game franchise that — at least to some extent — understands the importance of gender representation. Maybe their story about a journey shared by four men was a narrative worth telling.

Although I wasn’t alone in this speculation, I felt like I was in the minority. However, when Final Fantasy XV was released, I was not disappointed.

Bear with me for a moment while I make a brief aside: it was only two months ago that we heard Donald Trump justify bragging about sexual assault by referring to it as “locker room talk.” The implication that men are permitted or expected to speak crudely about women when we are not around in order to impress their mates was a sentiment that outraged a lot of people — including athletes who are very familiar with actual locker rooms. But it’s a common narrative: in order to impress one another and be accepted, men are expected to objectify and insult women.

While some men behave in this way because it adheres to their genuine view of women, there are also followers and bystanders who engage in this narrative because it’s what they believe they must do after seeing it in every movie, on every television show, and — with people like Trump justifying it in the public political sphere — on every news program. This can lead to all sorts of strange situations, including groups of men who don’t really believe anything they’re saying, yet still make crude comments or ‘rate’ women in terms of appearance because they think that other men expect it.

It’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. It’s rape culture. So how do we dismantle the idea of what occurs in a boys’ locker room without first creating one?

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‘Even the Ocean’ Offers a Message of Hope When We Need It Most

Even the Ocean

[Author’s Note: I was generously given a key to the game by the developers.]

Three years in the making, Even the Ocean is the artistic successor of Anodyne, and the result of talented developers Joni Kittaka and Sean Han-Tani-Chen-Hogan. The protagonist, Aliph, is a young power plant technician who is subjected to a mysterious event that places her on the frontlines of an energy and environmental crisis. It probably takes about ten to fifteen hours to complete both gameplay and narrative, but this estimate could vary wildly due to the multitude of features.

Checking the options against the moody backdrop of the opening menu offered settings to turn off flashing or shaking scenes, change controller mapping, player immortality, and more. In addition, there are narrative and gameplay style choices. Whether people prefer to just hear the story, want to speedrun, or give the default way a try, there’s a preference for all kinds of players. Personalization of playstyle is paramount.

Even the Ocean’s primary gameplay mechanic is a double-edged sword. To complete the levels, a balance of light and dark energies must be maintained and manipulated to access areas, up and down, left and right. Energy is radiated from mists, plants, and ghosts — to name but a few sources — and these energies permeate everything in the world. Everything has its place on the continuum, and the balance is Aliph’s life bar. Exceed too much light or dark energy, and she will die.

Undoubtedly, it’s a challenging platformer, and perfecting a particularly foxing puzzle is very satisfying. The levels are varied and constructed with an admirable attention to detail, and save points are sprinkled sufficiently. Some instances of leaping and sliding and timing are a little ornery, but there is an option to turn on helper blocks if you’re stuck. The fusion of platforming with the romantic and atmospheric soundtrack makes for an introspective playthrough.

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Sunday Loot: Check Out the Latest #GameJobs!

The Walking Dead

Happy Sunday, friends! We’re excited to bring you yet another round of our special series, one that will offer you a chance to get directly involved in the work that we do. Today, we’re sharing all the latest jobs that we came across in the games industry this past week, and we know that you’re a perfect fit for so many of them!

Some seriously big names cropped up — think Bioware, Naughty Dog, and Telltale — as well as a few other incredible opportunities that you might enjoy. All the details are below, so break out that cover letter and give your resume a last glance, because you’re so ready for this! The following teams are working hard to change the way we make and play games, and it’s only fitting that you help them do that.

As always, if you know of an inclusive gaming space or games project you’d love to see promoted on our Sunday Loot series, drop us a comment below or check out our contact list! We’d love to hear from you, especially about new and exciting spaces where all gamers can hang out.

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